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Understanding the Basis for Radiation Fears

•Do you work with radiation sources?
•Is your facility a safe place to work? How do you know?
•What does safe mean?
•How often do you actually evaluate radiation risks?
•Do you have all the facts for a fully informed, analytical, rational decision?
•How much does fear play a role in decisions for radiation safety?
•Is it OK to be afraid of radiation?

Psychologists tell us fears are a good thing for our safety. True fear is a response to a stimulus of imminent danger. Since radiation does not give us any warning sensation then decisions for radiation safety have to be based on imagination of unacceptable consequences. Risks of radiation injury are usually not imminent, but matters of future random chance. Most fears of radiation are also based on mythology (common beliefs that are not technically true). Since no one has ever had an experience of radiation, then fears of radiation are not true fears, but manufactured fears based

on images. Radiation phobias arise from questions of, “What if …….?” Radiation fears often arise from assumptions of cause and effect. The basis of radiation fears may be identified by the question, “What’s so bad about that?” A defensible answer to “Is this safe?” requires answers to a series of questions from cause to effect.

To read the complete paper as well as view the slides from Ray’s presentation at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Nondestructive Testing, click the link below.

Understanding the Basis for Radiation Fears (pdf)

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Ray’s Presentations to ASNT

Ray’s most recent presentations were at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) held in Las Vega. To view the handouts that accompanied his presentations click on the presentation titles (links) below or visit the Radiation Safety Counseling Institute webpage of Newsletters and Handouts.

Understanding The Basis for Radiation Fears

How We Make Decisions for Radiation Safety

Your comments or questions about his work is always welcome.

Link

UMM Newsletter Report of Ray’s Recent Presentation

UMM Newsletter Report of Ray’s Recent Presentation

Ray’s recent presentation to the Methodist Men at Oakdale Emory Church was reported in their monthly Newsletter (click on the link above then go to page 2). What I found interesting was the feedback provided by several of the attendees (pages 2-3). As always, we invite your feedback.

Radon, What is It? Why is it an Issue?

Ray’s most recent presentation was on radon and made to the Potomac Chapter of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA). To view the handouts that accompanied his presentation click on this link (Radon.pdf) or visit the Radiation Safety Counseling Institute webpage of Newsletters and Handouts.

Your comments or questions about his work is always welcome.

Radiation, Most of What you have Heard is Mythology

Ray recently made a presentation to the United Methodist Men at Oakdale Emory UMC in Olney, MD. To view the handouts that accompanied his presentation click on this link (Radiation Myths.pdf) or visit the Radiation Safety Counseling Institute webpage of Newsletters and Handouts.

Your comments or questions about his work is always welcome.

Presentations at American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition

Ray was an exhibitor and presenter at this year’s AIHce, held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from May 18-23, 2013. His presentations included:

  • NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) Measurements
  • How to Deal with Worker Concerns for NORM
  • How to Respond to Quick Decisions for Radiation Safety

Copies of his slideshows and handout materials are available on our website at http://radiationcounseling.org/news.html.

If you have questions about this information, post a reply or send him an email at ray@radiationcounseling.org.

Presentation to Baltimore-Washington Chapter, HPS – Annual Meeting

How Do We Make Decisions for Radiation Safety ?

  • What information do we rely upon ?
  • What observations ?
  • What experience ?
  • What others have told us ?
  • How do we evaluate this information ?

Ray presented his research on the factors that affect decision making and how it can lead to make errors. You can view his handout materials at Prone to Errors Handout.